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KIC Search Help

Warning: Users interested in locating potential targets for observation are advised to use the Kepler Target Search form which restricts queries to sources known to be at or near the CCD detector. Although the KIC contains roughly 13.2 million targets, only about 6.5 million are at or near the detector and of these only about 4.4 million are considered "on" the detector for at least one season. The Target Search form will also describe the position of the source on the detector and indicate whether the target is reserved by the Kepler science team.

Use the KIC Search form to search the Kepler_Input_Catalog by object name (resolved to coordinates), position, observation date, Kepler ID, etc., and to specify the content and format of the search results. Numerical columns can be plotted using the VOPlot link when the output format is HTML.

Note the MAST version of the Kepler Input Catalog contains two additional fields not contained in the original version:

  1. Although the KIC contained a Right Ascension field in decimal hours, we added a separate Right Ascension field in decimal degrees.
  2. The KIC contained an integer 2MASS designation but the standard 2MASS catalog ID, which is a sexagesimal, equatorial position-based source name in the form: hhmmssss+ddmmsss[ABC...] was added. (By default we display the latter.)

General Search Options and Operators

Search values can be specified in several different ways, depending on the data type of the field. In all cases, a single value can be entered (although this is not recommented for floating point values). In addition, various operators can be included depending on the data type of the field as described below.

The data types for each column can be displayed using the "Field Descriptions" link at the top of all MAST search forms.

  • Numerical fields - Real (i.e., real, numeric, float, or double) and Integer (i.e., long) fields can be specified as a single value, as a single value with numerical operators such as "< n", ">= n", and "!= n", "\null", or as an inclusive range (e.g., "1990 .. 2000"). Bcause of small differences in stored floating point values, specifying a single floating point value may not return the expected results. Therefore, numerical or range operators are recommended with floating point fields queries. Integers may be requested either way.

    The number of digits displayed to the right of the decimal point for floating point numbers is determined solely by the data type. If the data type is "real" only 1 digit is displayed, and for "numeric" 2 digits are displayed. "Float" data types have 3, and "double" can have up to 8 or more.

  • String fields - String fields, also known as "char" or "varchar" fields, can use the = (equal), != (not equal, e.g., != SMALL), \null , or the "*" , "%" wildcard operators (e.g. "Jup*). By default, string searches use equals ("=") which runs faster without wild cards but implies matches must be exact. For example, searching on Target description = "Planet" will not return an entry for "Planet:Jupiter". (There are some exceptions though such as searching on Kepler Investigation ID will automatically include wild cards.) Wildcards are allowed and encouraged when an exact match is not desired, so in the previous example, searching on Planet* would return all entries beginning with the word Planet. Quotes are not necessary for string values.

    Since moving to the Microsoft SQL Server database system in 2009, string searches are no longer case-sensitive. Values will still be displayed in the same case they were originally entered, but entries will be found regardless of the case of the searched string (i.e., searching for HST id "go-5916" or "GO-5916" will return the same entries).

    Also, as with any data type, commas can be used to search for multiple entries. For example, to search for all O3 and B3 stars from the Skiff catalog, just enter O3*,B3*. Likewise, entering \null,<5 will return values that are either null or less than 5.

  • Bibstring fields - Bibstrings are a special string field for storing ADS bibcodes. A bibstring value has 19 characters, and its assumed that no operators other than wild cards are included in queries. This data type was mainly added because ".." was normally interpreted as a range search request. For a bibstring field, specifying 2101ApJ..* means find all entries whose bibcode begins with 2010ApJ..

  • Coordinate fields - Generally you can specify a variety of formats for Right Ascension and Declination using either decimal degrees or sexagesimal values (RA in decimal hours is also available, but only as an output format option). The allowed search formats are described in detail below.

  • Date fields - Dates can also be specified in a variety of formats and can also use operators and inclusive range searches. Here are some allowed/recommended examples:
    • > Jul 15 1994
    • < 01-jan-2010
    • Dec 1 1995 .. Dec 6 1995
    • 01-jan-2009 .. 15-feb-2010
    • 2009-05-11 17:51:31 (but date match must be exact)
    • 20090115 .. 20100101
    • dec 2009 .. jan 2010
    • 2009 jan .. 2010 jan
    • 2009 .. 2010

    Formats found not to work or not recommended include:
    • 15 Jul 2005 (valid format but only returns entries with a value of 15 Jul 2005 00:00:00)
    • 15JUL2009 (same problem as above)
    • 15-jul-2009 (same problem as above)
    • 2009-01 (same problem as above)
    • 2009-10 .. 2010-01 (doesn't seem to work)
    • 2009-10-01 .. jan-01-2010 (don't mix formats in range searches)
    • jan-15-2009 .. feb-01-2010 (putting month before day doesn't work with dashes!)
    • Dec 15 2009 .. Dec 01 2009 (earlier date should be listed first)

    Often queries on a single date will fail because the database can store datetime fields to the millisecond and the matches must be exact. It is preferable to use a range or the <, > operators. Note that when the time is not specified, the query will default to 00:00:00. Therefore without specifying times, a range search would include the starting date but exclude the ending date. Leaving off the day or month would work similarly.

To see the data type of a particular field, click on the form element label or any of the help page links. Note quotes are not needed for any values. Note, searches on "null" values in fields of any data type are now possible by entering \null.

By default, the various search criteria will be submitted using logical AND's. Logical OR's are not supported on most mission search forms except when using commas within a single form element such as entering "hc230,srhlw" for IUE program ID to return entries with ID hc230 OR srhlw.. Information on individual search form elements is listed below. Note that specific examples given below do not necessarily apply to all missions. The examples are merely intended to show valid formats for data entry.

Local File Name
The name of a local file containing a table or list of parameters such as coordinates, targets names, or data IDs to be uploaded to the server and used to query the database. The file must be a plain ASCII text file (e.g., not DOC or RTF files) with either one entry per line (e.g., a target name, a Data ID, or a set of coordinates), or a table separated with one of the allowed delimiters, with targets, Data IDs, or RA and Dec values in the designated columns. Note in either case, only one entry per line is extracted. If, for example, a comma-separated list of target names is downloaded in one line, only the value in the designated column will be used.

For security reasons, there are many restrictions on file uploads. If you have trouble please contact the help desk.

The search script will perform a separate cone search for each extracted target name or set of coordinates contained in the uploaded list, with a separate table of results for each. Target names will be resolved to coordinates. If a resolver error occurs with target names, the search will abort and the compiled results displayed. (Note unresolved target names are not considered an error.) Coordinates may be given using sexigesimal notation or decimal degrees. When Data IDs or Kepler IDs are specified, the results are displayed in a single table. If the output is requested in CSV or Excel spreadsheet format, a blank line will be used to distinguish the results of one cone search from another. VOTable format incorporates separate RESOURCE tags for each cone search.

Use the other form entries to specify field delimiters, RA, DEC, or Target column numbers (when the file contains a table of values), and file contents (target names or coordinates). The browse button allows users to seach local directories to locate files.

Warning: Since uploading long lists can take a while to run, uploaded files are limited to 10,000 entries.

File Contents
Specifies the contents of the local file to be uploaded. The current choices are: coordinates, target names, and Data IDs (or for Kepler missions, Kepler IDs).

If "target name", or "coordinates" are specified, each entry is treated as a separate query. The results are displayed as each query is run. If however "Data IDs" or "Kepler IDs" is specified, (up to 10,000 are allowed), it is processed as a single query (e.g., select * where data_id in (ID1,ID2,...).

Recently, Simbad has started adding Kepler IDs to its list of resolvable target names. This means that for Kepler (and perhaps eventually K2), an uploaded list of IDs can be treated as either "Target Names", which generate a set of cone searches, or "Kepler IDs", which creates a single search result based on found IDs. The advantage to the latter search is that all the search results are listed in one table, and can be submitted for retrieval in one click.

To avoid displaying column names after each target name or coordinate query, consider using the comma-separated values output format. Also keep in mind that not all target names are resolvable. For example, SIMBAD currently does not reolve most 2MASS IDs.

RA/Target/Data ID Column Number
The column number containing either the Data ID, Right Ascension (decimal degrees or sexagesimal), or target name (depending on how file_contents is set). The default is to assume the first column is to be used.

Dec Column Number
For forms allowing coordinates as input, the column number containing the Declnation (decimal degrees or sexagesimal). The default is to assume the second column contains the DEC value. If the file contents is set to Target Name or any Data ID, this parameter is ignored.

Column Delimiter
The character used to delimit table entries in the uploaded file. Allowed values include tabs( ), commas(,), vertical bar (|), or semi-colons(;). The default is to assume tabs are the delimiters. If the file contains only a single column, use tabs as the delimiter.

Target Name
The name of the astronomical object you want to search for. Examples of valid names include gam Gem, NGC 1068, JUPITER, and hd 45677. For Kepler, a sky-region limited mission, examples might be 14 Cyg, HR 7483, HD 181649, or NGC 6819. Multiple target names can be entered if separated by commas, although table sorting is turned off in these cases.

Kepler input catalog numbers are also accepted in forms such as: kic1026032, 1026032, kplr1026032, kepler1026032, or kplr001026032. Kepler planet names can also be resolved when entered in a form such as kepler-7, kepler-32b, etc.

The Target Name is used in combination with the Resolver Field. If the SIMBAD, CFA (SIMBAD at CfA), or NED (default) resolver option is chosen, then coordinates returned from these services are used to perform a cone search with the specified search radius.

For most mission searches, you do not HAVE to use the resolver. Choose the "Don't resolve" option to perform string searches on the object name in the database. Note Kepler catalogs do not include a generic object name field, so this option is not available for Kepler users.

When you search on the object name in the database (i.e. without using the name resolver), case will be ignored. The object name will not be wildcarded at the front and back automatically (that's so if you innocently enter IO, you don't match things like ORION). You can however wildcard the object name using * (for example, *IO*). You can also enter a comma-separated list; for example, *JUP*,*SAT* would match object names containing either JUP or SAT.

Note that most missions store some target names in a format that is not compatible with the NED or SIMBAD name resolvers. For example, most 2MASS IDs are currently not resolveable by SIMBAD.

Resolver
This field describes how target names are to be handled. If you want to resolve a target name into its coordinates, use the default value "Resolve". You can also elect to search the database by the target name itself by choossing the "Don't Resolve" option.

The two main name resolver services are SIMBAD and NED. NED is the NASA Extragalactic Database at Caltech in Pasadena, California, and SIMBAD is the Set of Identifications, Measurements, and Bibliography for Astronomical Data at the Centre de Données astronomiques in Strasbourg, France (SIMBAD at CDS). A mirror site at the Center for Astrophysics in Boston is also now available. NED is an extragalactic database, and generally won't resolve object names within the Milky Way galaxy.

Because we occasionally have problems with network connections and web servers, we now store previously resolved target names and coordinates in our own local database and search this database before trying to access NED or SIMBAD. By default, If no entry is found in the local cache, the entered object names will be sent to the NED service, and, if still not found, then CDS.

If any error occurs, the search form will be redrawn with an error message at the top. Otherwise, the returned coordinates will then be used to search the database, along with whatever other query qualifications you have given.

We recommend that you use object name resolution to find observations of specific stationary targets. This is the most reliable way to look up observations, because the observer could have given any object name at all (for example, NGC1976 instead of M42, or PARALLEL-FIELD).

The SIMBAD and NED name resolvers can resolve only fixed objects; they cannot compute the positions of moving objects (planets, comets, etc.). To find moving objects, try selecting the appropriate category option available on most MAST search forms, or as mentioned above, enter an object name that could match what you're looking for, and select "Don't Resolve" for the name resolver. Note wild cards are allowed, so for Jupiter you might enter "*JUP*".

Right Ascension, Declination
The Right Ascension and Declination values. If single values are entered, a cone search is performed using the specified search radius (default = 3 arcminutes for most missions, 0.02 arcmin. for Kepler). Values may be entered in decimal degrees or using sexagesimal notation. Although decimal hours is NOT an allowed input format, Right Ascension search results may optionally be displayed as decimal hours (see the "Output Coords" form element).

Note the examples listed below (and elsewhere) are only intended to show the format of the form entries. There is no guarantee that entering these specific values will return any search results.

You may also enter ranges of right ascension or declination, using the ".." operator. For example, you can enter 21h 51m .. 21h 52m for the right ascension, and 28 51 .. 29 51 for the declination. Comparators can also be used, i.e. ">", ">=", "<", "<=". For example, "> 85" as a declination value will return all observations with declination larger than 85 degrees. (Note when ranges of coordinates are specified the search radius will be ignored. Also, searches on ranges can be quite time consuming.)

Coordinate values may be specified using a number of formats. Examples of valid formats include:

    Decimal Degrees
       	185.63325 29.8959861111111
 
    Hours, minutes and Seconds
        12 22 31.98      29 53 45.55
        12h22m31.98s     29d53m45.55s
        12:22:31.98     +29:53:45.55
        12h22'31.98"     29d53'45.55"
        12h 22m 31.98s   29d 53m 45.55s
        12h 22' 31.98"   29d 53' 45.55"
        12h 22' 31.98"  -29d 53' 45.55"
        12h22'31".98    -29d53'45".55
        12h22m31s.98    -29o53m45s.55
        12h 22' 31".98  -29d 53' 45".55
     
    Hours/Degrees and Minutes (no seconds)
        12 22     29 53
        12h22m   +29d53m
        12h22m    29d53m
        12:22m    29:53m
        12h22'    29d53'
        12h 22m   29d 53m
        12h 22'   29d 53'
        12h 22'  -29d 53'

    The RA may be given in decimal degrees by indicating
    a D or d after the degrees:
        12d 22m   29d 53m
Spacing is not important, as long as the value is unambiguous. You can delimit the hours/degrees, minutes, and (optional) seconds with letters, colons, spaces, or any character that's not a digit or a decimal point. Like target names, multiple coordinates can be entered if separated by commas.

Radius
The radius of the search box around the RA and Dec, in floating-point arcminutes (e.g., 5.0). You should be careful about giving too restrictive a search radius since (for some missions) the coordinates of the object were given by the Guest Observer, and may not reflect the precise pointing of the instrument at the time of the observation.

The search routine computes the angular separation between each result dataset and the search center so this really is a circular radius. (Results are generally sorted on the angular separation by default.)

Equinox
The equinox of the RA and Dec you have entered, either B1900, B1950 or J2000. If B1900 or B1950 are selected, the input coordinates are precessed to year 2000, but NOT converted to FK5 or ICRS. This will add an error which (from year 1900) can range from a few arcseconds up to roughly 25" at the poles.

Note the precession is only applied to the input coordinates. The coordinates displayed in the search results will depend on the mission database and the selected output columns. (Note: all MAST missions include J2000 coordinates as default output columns.)

If you enter a target name and use either the SIMBAD or NED name resolver, the equinox will be set to J2000.

Kepler ID
A unique sequential integer ID assigned by Kepler project. Values run from 1 to over 13,161,029. Searches can be made for specific values (e.g., 12345678), ranges (e.g., 100 .. 150), or using < or > symbols (e.g., < 20).

Proper Motion
Total proper motion accurate to 20 mas/yr. Current values range from 0 to 9.6 arcseconds/year.

Effective Temperature
Derived effective temperature accurate to 200 K Current values range from 3103 to 19,337 K.

Stellar Radius
Estimated stellar radius Values range from 0.097 to 316.303 (1.0 = solar radius)

E(B-V)
Derived excess B-V reddening accurate to 0.1 magnitudes. Values range from 0.001 to 1.459

Log G
Estimated log G surface gravity accurate to 0.5 dex. Current values from -0.435 to 6.158.

Metallicity
Estimated Log10 Fe/H metallicity accurate to 0.5 dex Current range: -2.63 to 0.618

User Specified Field n
You may use these form elements to search on any column(s) in the mission table. First, select the field you wish to search from the pulldown menu under the "User-specified field n" heading. Then, type in the qualification in the corresponding "Field Descriptions" box. Clicking on the "Field Descriptions" link, will display information on the allowed fields including the allowed range of values.

As an example, a Kepler user might select "E(B-V)" from the pulldown menu and enter "< 0.5" in the "Field Descriptions" box.

NOTE only fields which are not already included on the search form should be selected. Specifying search criteria for a field that is listed in BOTH the form and in the User Specified field, may cause either the query to fail or return unexpected results.

Output Columns
This form element allows you to determine which columns are displayed and in what order. The initial list contains those designated as defaults, but it may be possible to add more. (Its possible a project decided all columns should be displayed by default.)

To remove a column, highlight the column to be removed then click the "remove" button to the right of the output columns list. To remove all columns, click the "remove all" button. This is useful when only a few output columns are desired. If a search is submitted with all columns removed, it will display the original set of default columns.

To add a column, select the desired column from the pull down menu beneath the list of chosen output columns, then click the "add" button. The column will be added to the bottom of the output column list. To add all the available columns, click the "add all" button.

You can change the order of columns by highlighting a column and then clicking the up or down buttons to the right of the list of chosen output columns. Each click moves the column by one position. Note the "Mark" column, which allows data sets to be retrieved, will always appear at the top of the list. If desired though it can be removed.

The output columns form element has its own "reset" button to restore the list of output columns to the original defaults. This is different than the "Reset" button at the top of the form which is used to reset the other form elements. Clicking the "clear form" button will restore the original defaults in all sections of the form.

One warning, the amount of memory required and possibly the execution time for a search is proportional to the amount of information returned. For large requests, users may want to reduce the number of output columns to the minimum required. Also consider non-html output formats and the "Skip formatting" option.

Suppress Null Result Message
By default, when using "file upload mode", the message "No Records Found Matching Query" (or for non-html output, "no rows found") is displayed for each entry with no search results. Clicking this button will prevent these messages from appearing which may be useful for reducing output from large search results.

Verb
Verb is an integer parameter used by the VO community for specifying the amount of output returned for a given search request. It is only available when retrieving data as a web service but works with every MAST service. Setting verb=3 in a search request is equivalent to specifying "add all" from a search form; it will return all the available columns in the output not just the standard default fields. Currently setting verb to any other value has no effect.

Sort output by:
Choose how you want the output rows sorted. You can select up to three fields to sort on. The rows will be sorted in the order of the first sort field; if two rows have the same sort field, they will be sorted in order of the second sort field, and so on. Default sort fields may be listed, but any field from the pulldown list can be used. Specifying multiple sort fields may increase execution time. If you prefer no sorting, you can specify "null" for all 3 fields. This may speed up the query, but results will be displayed in the order in which they were originally stored in the database table.

For each field, you can select that the rows be sorted in reverse order on that field by selecting the reverse checkbox. For example, you can sort the rows with the most recent observations first by selecting Observation Date for the first sort field and selecting the reverse checkbox next to it.

One word of caution: the selected sort field can change the search results when the query finds more rows than are displayed ( i.e, when the number of found rows exceeds the value of "maximum records"). For example, for a search on a particular coordinate that finds 5,000 entries, if the search is sorted on exposure time and 1,001 rows are to be displayed (the default), then the 1,001 shortest exposures from the 5,000 found entries will be displayed which may not include the entries closest to the desired position. (It is a good idea to always sort on "ang_sep" for target or coordinate searches).

Finally, note that when displaying the search results in HTML, further sorting is possible based on any of the displayed columns simply by clicking the column header. Even columns using sexigesimal notation can now be correctly sorted. Clicking a header a 2nd time will reverse the order. Reloading the page will return results to the original order. (This sorting is performed using javascript, so javascript needs to be enabled.)

Display Coordinates
Specifies the format for displaying the primary equatorial (i.e., RA and Dec) coordinates. The options include:
  • Sexagesimal - The default format with Right Ascension specified as hh mm ss.sss and Declination as +/-dd mm ss.ss ( e.g., RA = 12 46 11.091, Dec = -00 30 12.08). Note an extra digit was added as of June, 2012.
  • Degrees - Decimal degrees for both RA and Dec with 7 significant figures to the right of the decimal point (e.g., RA=191.5461912, Dec=-0.5033333). Note 2 extra digits were added as of June, 2012. or
  • Hours - Decimal hours for RA and decimal degrees for Dec in same format as for decimal degrees (e.g., RA=12.7697512, Dec=-0.5033333). Note decimal hours = decimal degrees/15.0. (Note 2 extra digits were added as of June, 2012.)
Any other coordinate fields contained in the searched mission catalog will be displayed in their original format.

Maximum Records
This value specifies the maximum number of rows returned in a single query. For the standard mission search forms, the current default is 5,001, but values from 1 to 50,001 are allowed. For the file upload forms in which multiple targets, data ID's, or coordinates can be specified, the default is set to 20 rows per file entry, with allowed values ranging from 1 to 5,000.

Note when displayed as HTML, the latest search scripts will display 500 records per page. Links to the additional pages are shown on the results page. This paging feature however does require javascript to be turned on.

Users should be cautioned about retrieving a large number of records (i.e., > 10,000 - 15,000) in HTML format. This can cause memory problems for the browser (particulrly Safari) and prevent javascript commands from functioning. It may also cause the browser to freeze and require restarting. Using the output format options which download results in a file can reduce the problem.

Another option for large requests is to use "Casjobs". Casjobs requires requesting a user name and password, and submitting queries in SQL, but it allows users to submit large search results and save them online. For Kepler, the link ito Casjobs is http://mastweb.stsci.edu/kplrcasjobs/. For other missions, check the Search_Retrieve page in the left gutter.

When queries are submitted as a web service, the default number of rows returned is 2,000, but any value is allowed when max_rows is specified as a query parameter. (See the MAST Web services page for more information.)

Records per page
This parameter controls the number of records displayed per web page. By default, 500 rows or records are displayed per HTML page. Therefore if 2000 records are returned, links to 4 pages will be displayed at the top and bottom of the results table. The paging feature however uses javascript, so if javascript is turned off, paging won't work and only the rows shown on the first page can be displayed. This is one reason why increasing the default value may be helpful. Note this value is ignored when output formats other than HTML are selected.

Make Rows Distinct
Selecting this checkbox will restrict the display to only rows in which every output column value for a given row is unique. This option is primarily useful when only a small number of columns are displayed (i.e., using the "remove" button to remove default output columns) and when the selected columns have duplicate values. Including columns which already have unique values (e.g. Kepler ID or Data ID) will make the "Distinct" option ineffective.

As an example, a IUE or FUSE user might want to create a list of unique target names for a specific object class/category. He or she would specify the desired object class, select only "object Class" and "target name" for the output columns, click the "Make Rows Distinct" button, then click "Search".

Note that for some missions, columns such as RA, Dec and Magnitude were frequently defined by the observer and often have different values for the same target. If columns such as these are chosen as output columns, there will often be more than one row listed per object name.

Remove Null Columns
After the search results are retrieved from the database, selecting this option will remove columns with all null values. Zeroes are maintained. In some cases selecting this option can reduce the execution times, but it can also take longer depending on the number of null columns and the number of columns selected.

Removing null columns is primarily useful for sparsely-populated tables when a large number of columns are requested. Note for the HSC summary form this option is selected by default.

Skip Formatting
After the results are retrieved from the database, some reformatting is done. This includes converting decimal degrees to sexagesimal format, restricting the number of significant numbers displayed for certain data types, changing date formats, etc. Since this processing may be applied to every row and column, and as catalogs keep getting larger, this step can significantly slow down large requests (e.g., queries returning more than a few thousand rows). Checking this box will skip these steps and thereby reduce execution times.

Output Format
You may choose any of the following formats for displaying/storing search results. If you are using a browser (e.g., Firefox, etc) to submit a query from a MAST web form, the formats labelled "File: ..." offer a way to download results directly to your local computer. Choose any of the other format options if you want to display the results in the browser, or if you are submitting the request from a program (see MAST web services).
  • HTML_Table (default) - results returned as a standard HTML table including various links for retrieving data, displaying previews, literature references, plotting spectra, etc.
  • File: Excel_Spreadsheet - results are stored as an Excel spreadsheet file. (Note: assumes users computer/browser provides support for Excel-format files). The default file name when downloaded is "mission"_search.xls where "mission" is the mission name (e.g., fuse_search.xls).
  • VOTable - an XML format adopted by the Virtual Observatory (VO) project and displayed in the user's browser. Note coordinates in VOTable format are always in decimal degrees rather than sexagesimal format. For searches returning results from more than one mission and/or target, multiple "resource" tags are created. Searches with a radius of 0 will return a VOTable file listing the output fields for that particular mission/catalog. (For more information on the XML file format, see VOTable documentation.)
  • Comma-separated values - a simple ASCII array containing column headings followed by rows of comma-separated values. In file upload mode, a blank line is inserted between the search results to separate multiple target queries.
  • Space-separated values - a simple ASCII array containing column headings followed by rows of space-separated values. In file upload mode, a blank line is inserted between the search results to separate multiple target queries. Note users may want to select coordinates in decimal rather than sexagesimal format to maintain the correspondence between column headings and entries although some column headings may contain blanks as well. (Semi-colons, pipes, or commas are probably safer delimiters.)
  • IRAF Space-separated values with INDEFs - Like the space-separated format above except empty fields are replaced with the string "INDEF". This format is useful for IRAF-compatibility.
  • Semi-colon separated values - a simple ASCII array containing column headings followed by rows of semi-colon separated values. In file upload mode, a blank line is inserted between the search results to separate multiple target queries.
  • Tab-separated values - a simple ASCII array containing tabs for delimiters. May be useful for ingesting into Excel spreadsheets.
  • Pipe-separated values - a simple ASCII array containing column headings followed by rows of pipe or vertical bar separated values. (Note: not offered in file upload mode.)
  • Json format - Javascript Object Notation (json) is a simple machine and human-readable, name/value ASCII format supported by many programming languages. (Note: not offered in file upload mode.)
  • File: comma-separated values - a simple ASCII text file containing column headings followed by rows of comma-separated values. In file upload mode, a blank line is inserted between the search results to separate multiple target queries. Rather than being displayed in the browser, the results are directly downloaded to the users computer using the file name "mission"_search.txt where "mission" is the mission name (e.g., hst_search.txt). Depending on the browser settings, the user may be prompted for a file location before the file is downloaded.
  • File: Space-separated values - a simple ASCII text file containing column headings followed by rows of space-separated values. In file upload mode, a blank line is inserted between the search results to separate multiple target queries. Rather than being displayed in the browser, the results are directly downloaded to the users computer using the file name "mission"_search.txt where "mission" is the mission name (e.g., hst_search.txt). Depending on the browser settings, the user may be prompted for a file location before the file is downloaded.
  • File: IRAF Space-separated values with INDEFs - Like the space-separated format above except empty fields are replaced with the string "INDEF". This file format is useful for IRAF-compatibility.
  • File: Semicolon-separated values - a simple ASCII text file containing column headings followed by rows of semicolon-separated values. In file upload mode, a blank line is inserted between the search results to separate multiple target queries. Rather than being displayed in the browser, the results are directly downloaded to the users computer using the file name "mission"_search.txt where "mission" is the mission name (e.g., hst_search.txt). Depending on the browser settings, the user may be prompted for a file location before the file is downloaded.
  • File: Tab-separated values - a simple ASCII file containing tabs for delimiters. May be useful for ingesting into Excel spreadsheets.
  • File: Pipe-separated values - a simple ASCII text file containing column headings followed by rows of pipe-separated values. (Note: not offered in file upload mode.) Rather than being displayed in the browser, the results are directly downloaded to the users computer using the file name "mission"_search.txt where "mission" is the mission name (e.g., hst_search.txt). Depending on the browser settings, the user may be prompted for a file location before the file is downloaded.
  • File: Json format - Javascript Object Notation (json) is a simple machine and human-readable, name/value ASCII format supported by many programming languages. Rather than being displayed in the browser, the results are directly downloaded to the users computer using the file name "mission"_search.txt where "mission" is the mission name (e.g., hst_search.txt). Depending on the browser settings, the user may be prompted for a file location before the file is downloaded.
  • File: WGET Commands - This option is only available for certain missions. If selected, a shell script file is output which the user can execute from his own computer to download all the selected files with one command. The shell script file uses the "WGET" program which is available for most operating systems. Note for Kepler, two WGET options are available: "File: WGET LC commands" will create a script for downloading available light curves, "File: WGET TPF commands" (also available for K2) will create a script for downloading target pixel files. For Swift, the WGET option will create a script for downloading the Sky coordinate images.

Note: If no entries are found for an entry a "no entries found" message is written in the selected format and the program continues. In all cases, error conditions will cause the database search to abort.